[Pdf / Kindle ePUB] 浅草紅團 Asakusa kurenai dan Author Yasunari Kawabata



10 thoughts on “浅草紅團 Asakusa kurenai dan

  1. says:

    Beggars are people tooCrazy people are women tooFallen women were once naïve young girlsMen who indulge in ‘flesh trade

  2. says:

    Kawabata's The Scarlet Gang of Asakusa is supposed to be a work of modernism and New Perceptionist blah blah Those words mean nothing to me It's like trying not to translate everything front to back when you're learning a se

  3. says:

    For me the most fascinating area of Tokyo is Asakusa In the 1920s that neighborhood was a combination of red light district music hall theaters movie theaters street food vendors amusement park and gambling dens oh and a big shrine as well Now it is primarily a tourist attraction but still it has the feel of old downtown

  4. says:

    This novel is distinctly different from what Kawabata would go on to write It's very modern in that it avoids plot and the real character of this novel is Asakusa More than any of the humans followed in the novel even than the narrator what this novel is about is AsakusaIt's a much playful novel than what woul

  5. says:

    For any westerner living in Tokyo this novel is incredibly interesting for the way it captures 1929 1930 Asakusa

  6. says:

    Very difficult to follow for mine a curio of Kawabata’s work You can see the themes in his later work appearing but the mixed voic

  7. says:

    I'd be the first to admit that my hyperbole tends as hyperbole should to curse and profane works of fiction and alternatively to gush about them with an almost masturbatory fervor There's not much room for anything between these two extremes And I'm not ashamed of that How else could I convey either my distaste for the absolute shit hatted al

  8. says:

    I write as an admirer of Kawabata's later books studies of families or in the case of the Master of Go masters competing at a game all with a very Japanese wistfulness and sense of things passing But Kawabata's take on this

  9. says:

    A self consciously modern novel about Tokyo's Asakusa district in interwar Japan The plot alternates between frenetic activity and long descriptive passages of Asakusa and its inhabitants juvenile gang members pro

  10. says:

    My heart tends to sink when I am faced by any early twentieth century modernist novel and the so if I know that it is modernism take

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characters È PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ´ Yasunari Kawabata

Ancers and famous authors Originally serialized in a Tokyo daily newspaper in 1929 and 1930 this vibrant novel uses unorthodox kinetic literary techniues to reflect the raw energy of Asakusa seen through the eyes of a wandering narrator and the cast of mostly female juvenile delinuents who show him their way of life Markedly different from. For any westerner living in Tokyo this novel is incredibly interesting for the way it captures 1929 1930 Asakusa It shows the relatively innocent underbelly of society through a cast of uirky and likable characters You ll definitely see Asakusa and Tokyo in general in a new light From a literary standpoint it s interesting because it was Kawabata s attempt at modernism It was experimental and for this reason it can be a little hard to follow The time line s a mess there are a million characters and connections to keep track of the narrator may or may not have been the author andor the antagonist it s not always immediately clear who s speaking etc It felt like looking through the eyes of a four year old whose attention focuses on only what s the most intriguing at that moment and then uickly moves on to the next thing that catches hisher eye But this is why I loved this novel With the choppy narrative and uick pace we can almost feel what life for these characters must have been like I can t imagine a conventional style capturing this in uite the same way Dangerous Melody (Treasure Seekers year old whose attention focuses on only what s the most intriguing at that moment and then uickly moves on to the next thing that catches hisher eye But this is why I loved this novel With the choppy narrative and uick pace we can almost feel what life for these characters must have been like I can t imagine a conventional style capturing this in uite the same way

Read 浅草紅團 Asakusa kurenai dan

浅草紅團 Asakusa kurenai dan

Kawabata's later work The Scarlet Gang of Asakusa shows this important writer in a new light The annotated edition of this little known literary gem includes the original illustrations by Ota Saburo The annotations illuminate Tokyo society and Japanese literature bringing this fascinating piece of Japanese modernism at last to a wide audien. I d be the first to admit that my hyperbole tends as hyperbole should to curse and profane works of fiction and alternatively to gush about them with an almost masturbatory fervor There s not much room for anything between these two extremes And I m not ashamed of that How else could I convey either my distaste for the absolute shit hatted almost perverse fawning over of sheer crap winks to you Rowling you had a good middle but that s about it or my astonishment at weak or non reviewed works of pure fantastical amazingness This book actuallyScarlet Gang is one of those books where I try and try to elucidate why it s so goddamn good and I just sit here shaking my head wondering what to say and not say First off there s nothing postmodern here I hate even typing the word This is a stroller s work that would ve done Walter Benjamin proud Narrator walks through the shady seedy and most fun part of Tokyo during its heyday in the late 20s and tells us stories about the people he knows and sees He describes the craven charm of the place There s even a main character the boy haired Yumiko who seeks love revenge and maybe even a kind of oblivion that city s seek in themselves maps turned inward maybe I don t want to read too much into her she does enough of that on her ownShe s just the central pivot for the goings on of Scarlet Gang There s hobos prostitutes showgirls young street thugs homeless people poor people earthuakes buildings falling boats hired for murder pretty much everything you could want And it s all handed to you in a back alley where girls play pianos and red laundry bleeds down onto the gravel with all its full luster and weird urban eroticismA book many might hate for its lack of real cohesive storylines but it s there you just have to think and feel a little deeper than you normally would My favorite book of the year Mischief and Marriage you Rowling Blackmailed Into the Greek Tycoons Bed (International Billionaires, young street thugs homeless people poor people earthuakes buildings falling boats hired for murder pretty much everything Her Husbands Christmas Bargain you could want And it s all handed to The Geography of Witchcraft you in a back alley where girls play pianos and red laundry bleeds down onto the gravel with all its full luster and weird urban eroticismA book many might hate for its lack of real cohesive storylines but it s there Hold On To Me you just have to think and feel a little deeper than Copping It Sweet (Murphys Law you normally would My favorite book of the Ill Be Yours for Christmas (Harlequin Blaze, year

characters È PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ´ Yasunari Kawabata

In the 1920s Asakusa was to Tokyo what Montmartre had been to 1890s Paris and Times Suare was to be to 1940s New York Available in English for the first time The Scarlet Gang of Asakusa by Nobel Prize winner Yasunari Kawabata captures the decadent allure of this entertainment district where beggars and teenage prostitutes mixed with revue d. Beggars are people tooCrazy people are women tooFallen women were once na ve young girlsMen who indulge in flesh trade aren t called fallen men As I scribble these words my pen comes to a grinding halt The notebook laid there crammed with the vestiges of my thoughts The flux of my words was at the mercy of an inaccessible sheet of paper No matter where landing stage of the wordy compositions deviates words always appear to be imperfect when expressing the inexpressible The voyeur within me now precedes Kawabata s voyeuristic world attempting to comprehend human incidents through an impartial lens the accomplices to my silence aiding to unearth the truth veiled in the allusive reflection of the transient beauty The unassuming moon silently floating on the water mirrors the unreal within the real the reflections on the windows ceasing to exist upon a whiff of wind the window opening into a bargained emptiness A tiny drop of water is competent to epitomize the reflection of the moon and the window oblivious to its crystalline pictorial pushes forward committing perjury Life is a mingled yarn of all things echoic and nonechoic pure and impure sincerity and deceit the vitality of a perishable life holding onto the wispy filaments of pure longing The world of nothingness steadily awakens with the melodious sound of the bells of the Senso Temple the rhythmic choreographed long legs tapping to the blues of the jazz the murmur of the piano from the dimly lit geisha house the chatter of the rickshaw pullers the tranuility of the Sumida River colliding with the exhilaration of the Casino Foiles the fragrance of the camellia oil soothing the incoherence of the streets of Asakusa Asakusa is Asakusa is for everyone In Asakusa everything is flung out in the raw Desires dance naked All races all classes all jumbled together forming a bottomless endless current flowing day and night no beginning no end Asakusa is alive Azenb Soeda Akin to the many and various algae proliferating on a summer s day stretching put a lush emerald carpet over the stagnant waters of the Gourd Pond Asakusa comes alive with the vibrant hustle and bustle on the streets The lyrical verses of Soeda resonates the wonders of Asakusa A home for the homeless a love for the loveless a source of food for the famished a world of leftovers of leftovers Asakusa a melting pot to amalgamating all races and classes euating to any thriving city on the face of this earth and yet Asakusa finds distinctiveness in the allure of its design How or rather who creates the infrastructure of a city How are places resurrected from their own ruins People nurture the land and the land in turns fashions the prevailing communities Among the elderly delinuents of time Asakusa was a young punk It exudes an energetic charm seeking the genuine vitality of life positivity through the purity of wild Asakusa was a lost piece found through its very own peopleKawabata generates a fascinating dais for Asakusa as a human market attracting all and sundry from hobos prostitutes juvenile delinuents geishas shop girls flappers vagabonds artists and the entire artistic shenanigans rough plays where the ornate dressings rooms of the ero ueens are as amusing as the man feeding wheat crackers to the carp in the pool while munching on few of from the pack But essentially Asakusa is like a specimen in the Bug House something completely different from today s world like a remote island or some African village led by a chief a whole net of time honored codes over it Originally published as a miscellaneous series in news dailies the Asakusa chronicles finds it titular derivations in the wanderings of the Scarlet Gang The self christened theatrical group The Scarlet Troupe publicized their hope of performing something spectacular in the kitschy votive stickers plastered all over the vacant walls in the city Over the years embarrassed by this modernist work of his Kawabata once had said All I did was walk I never became acuainted with any of the young delinuents I never addressed a word to the vagrants either but I took notes A young man with a baggage of just a pen and a notebook wayfaring through the heart of Tokyo in the aftermath of the 1923 The Great Kanto Earthuake investigated lonesome demimonde lives existing on the societal periphery Kawabata being a silent fl neur preserves a certain sense of objectivity and distancing in his reportage and yet ironically the acute perceptions are cryptic evaluation in their abstractions The trajectory of the narrative rocks back and forth amid three distinct articulations accompanied by multifaceted active and passive vocalizations Kawabata takes the reader along with him through the alleys of Asakusa Kawabata devotedly address Dear Readerjust take a walk along the alleys Dear Readeras you knows what would you do if you were in their place The subtle prod eventually turns the reader into a loyal companion to the narrator The I of the reader dissolving in the I of the narrator With its evenly matched pictorial illustrations denoting the aspects of materialistically cultural grandeur capturing one of Tokyo s fascinating socio cultural era of history and social relationships this book registers a certain pop fic ambience Nevertheless Kawabata the literary master that he is stays true to his art astutely conveying the philosophical totality of mono no aware allying the uintessence of transience beauty with the subseuent sadness The melodrama budding within the printed pages leaps through the loops of subtle humour economic recession resistance to convention and the idea of love mingled with eroticism and vengeful crudity encumbered with the emptiness of longing The dregs of Asakusa But as long as she can still run she s still a woman Because most of the bums are no longer human enough to run The weathered folks no longer talk They live amid the hustle and bustle of the commercial district without saying a word The malleable taste of the backstreets was sexy and absurd The impish labyrinth of Asakusa is an inconclusive world of nothingness but it is not nihilistic When I m with a man I m always sizing myself up weighing the part of me that wants to become a woman against the part of me that is afraid to Then I fell miserable and even lonely The yen for fulfilling the ideals of womanly dwells within the fragile beauty of Yumiko and Oharu Yumiko s desire to be viewed as a man pulsates through the memories of her being the fateful daughter of the earthuake the vengeance of the kittenish arsenic kiss sailing on the Sumida River Umekichi s confessions of love residing the idea of love on the lips of a middle aged woman The radiance of red and purple sashes blending in the fated hues of the fallen women The transparency of Ochiyo s lunacy contrasting the rouge of the Okin on the bank The emptiness offalseness of the varied protagonists is forged ahead surviving the customs of their incompleteness Asakusa had perhaps been for him Kawabata as it was for me a place that allowed anonymity freedom where life flowed on no matter what where you could pick up pleasure and where small rooms with paper flowers were rented by the hour Donald Richie Afterword Wading through an interminable picturesue lattice of memories and dewy eyed faces the rawness of dreams drifting though an endless ebb and flow of desires and pleasures strewn with snippets and snapshots floating in a stoic air this chronicled narrative resembles a fragmented puzzle And you find yourself plucking these couettishly na ve and seductively sinister wanderings assembling it piece by piece into a significant portrait an art illuminated in its own abstraction by its own peculiarities Richie s accuracy in his noteworthy inferences about Asakusa being a pathway of anonymity to an uninterrupted freedom resonates in the sensory perceptions captured amongst the echoes of dear reader The human flow aggressive in survival and passionate in expression pulsates throughout my cerebral silence bringing Asakusa alive within the spiritless walls of my room an absurd persuasion enticing me to seize the floating moon amid the nimble watery ripples The yearning to obtain the unobtainable The need to discover the sincerity and beauty in the depths of nothingness Luminescent in the aureate sun the urge to grab the ephemeral beauty of a piece of glass before it being engulfed by the shadows of the passing day is how Kawabata s Asakusa chronicles captivates me And I certainly do not need a new notebook for my words as my thoughts are no longer at the mercy of neither the pen nor the paper